XPath Operators

Here are the operators we use in xslt for various calculations

I have symbolized the numbers by e1, e2,..

Operator Description
e1 + e2 If e1 and e2 are numbers, their sum
e1 – e2 e1 minus e2
e1 * e2 Product of e1 and e2
e1 div e2 If e1 and e2 are numbers, their quotient as a fl oating-point value.
e1 mod e2 The fl oating-point remainder of e1 divided by e2 .
e1 = e2 Tests to see if e1 equals e2
e1 & lt ; e2 Tests to see if e1 is less than e2 . You can’t say e1 < e2 inside an attribute: the less-than sign must be escaped as “& lt; ” .
e1 & lt ;= e2 Tests to see if e1 is less than or equal to e2
e1 & gt ; e2 Tests for greater-than
e1 != e2 Tests for inequality
e1 and e2 True if both e1 and e2 are true. If e1 is false, e2 is not evaluated
e1 or e2 True if either e1 or e2 is true. If e1 is true, e2 is not evaluated
e1 / e2 The / operator separates levels in a tree. For example, “/barge/load” selects all children of the element child of the document node
//e Abbreviation for descendant-or-self:: e
./e Abbreviation for self:: e
../e Abbreviation for parent:: e
@e Abbreviation for attribute:: e
e1 | e2 Selects the union of nodes that match e1 and those that match e2
* A wild-card operator; matches all nodes of the proper type for the context. For example, “*” selects all child elements of the context node, and “feet/@*” selects all attributes of the context node’s children
e1 [ e2 ] Square brackets enclose a predicate , which speci fi es an expression e2 that selects nodes from a larger set e1 .For example, in the XPath expression “para[@class=’note’]” , the para e1 [ e2 ] selects all children of the context node, and then the predicate selects only the children that have an attribute class=”note”. Another example: “item[1]” would select the first child of the context node
$e The dollar sign indicates that the following name is a variable name. For example, in an XSLT script, if variable n is set to 357, is expanded to the string “357” .
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